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The LAST month of peak season 2016

Was this is best peak season ever? It really all depends on one’s perspective. I spoke to a cross country van operator last week and he told me it was his best 4 month stint in terms of revenue ever. I then spoke to a 25 year veteran move coordinator, she told me this year was extremely difficult due to the lack of van line drivers and the increased use of alternative capacity. One thing for sure, when the dust settles in September there will be plenty of lessons learned and much to do in preparation for 2017.

I’m very proud of my team @ U491 in Sacramento California. Quality scores are up, revenue is up, claims are down and office morale is VERY GOOD! Excellent job team! Inventory

Over 17 Years, Chipman Relocation & Logistics donates $100,000 in Toys

Each year, for the last 17 years, van operators from Chipman Relocation & Logistics (Concord, California) donate money to organizations collecting toys for children in need. Those donations have been matched by Tom Chipman. This year, van operators donated $2,272 and Tom donated $4,540 bringing the total to about $7,400. Over the past 17 years, it is believed that Chipman and its van operators have donated more than $100,000 in toys to organizations such as Solano Heroes, Bluestar Moms, Children Nurturing Project and Toys for Tots.

Nine Tips for Starting Out or Starting Over | Monster.com

Continue reading → Nine Tips for Starting Out or Starting Over | Monster.com

Highway Bill a Victory for Moving Companies and Consumers, Says American Moving & Storage Association

Alexandria, VA) —The American Moving & Storage Association represents national van lines, independent movers and industry suppliers, and serves as the home of the ProMover certification program. Scott Michael, president and CEO, and Dan Veoni, vice president of government affairs, comment on today’s passage of the Fixing America’s Surface Transportation (FAST) Act by the U.S. Congress.

“The American Moving & Storage Association commends Congress for passing a bipartisan, long-term transportation funding bill that will provide much-needed investments in our nation’s roads. This bill represents a victory for both moving companies and consumers,” said Scott Michael. “We are pleased to see that the legislation addresses many of the priorities we have been fighting for this year, especially higher annual funding levels over a shorter period of time. Our bridges and highways urgently need a serious upgrade that will help strengthen America’s economy. This bill makes sure that both moving company drivers and everyday Americans can have access to a more modern transportation system. We thank all our members who visited and contacted congressional offices this year for helping achieve this successful result.”

“The American Moving & Storage Association appreciates that Congress heard our calls for regulatory reform that will better protect consumers and improve safety on our nation’s highways,” said Dan Veoni. “The bill removes the flawed Compliance, Safety, Accountability scores from public view while the agency improves the program’s methodology. It also establishes a household goods working group to reduce the paperwork burden on consumers, and creates a pilot program for young veterans to drive commercial vehicles across state lines, although we believe this should be expanded to all qualified commercial driver’s license holders under the age of 21. Finally, we are glad to see that Congress will not increase the number of states allowed to impose new tolls on interstate highways, which would have added burdensome new costs on both movers and consumers.”

Scott Michael added, “The American Moving & Storage Association urges President Obama to sign the FAST Act into law without delay. Even with the passage of this bill, our work is not complete. We will continue to fight for strong consumer protections and federal policies that ensure a safe, successful moving experience for millions of people each year.”

Thinking about moving to California?

California Dreaming?

Moving to California is a concept as American as apple pie. Here is a guide to make it more than just a dream.

@edmelton

Moving Advice

Before moving to California, you should know one thing: there are a lot of people living here. At last count, almost 38 million. This isn’t to say that you’ll have to learn to fight for elbow room just to get around.

In fact, there are many places in the state where you can lead a life with plenty of breathing (and elbow) room. And if you’re coming from a sizable metropolitan area elsewhere in the nation, you might not even notice much of a change.

If, however, you’re moving to CA from a comparatively sparsely populated region, you’re likely to take one look at the vast freeway-bound throngs and wonder how more people don’t succumb to ochlophobia (fear of crowds).

If you’re moving to California and headed for one of the state’s bigger metro areas like San Francisco, San Jose, San Diego or Los Angeles, you’ll do well to arrange your schedule around the high probability of freeway traffic.

You’re not always guaranteed to run into gridlock, but the occasional traffic jam can even be found on Sunday nights. Here are a few insider tips to help make your migration to California go smoothly.
  • Heaviest freeway traffic occurs between the hours of 6AM and 9PM in the morning, and 3PM to 7PM in the afternoon.
  • Carpool lanes are established to allow vehicles with more than one passenger access to a more free-flowing traffic lane; however, many of them are only carpool lanes during certain hours of the day. Pay attention to this.
  • An adult riding with a child is considered a carpool.
  • Due to California’s pervasive “car culture,” there are very few places within the state that can’t be accessed via paved road.
  • San Francisco’s hilly streets are known the world over for their unusual layout, but if you’re moving to CA with your sights set on Fog City (or a city with a similar, hilly orientation), be sure you know in advance what the parking situation adjacent to your new home will be.
  • Moving van permits aren’t required, but are a smart thing to have in order to secure a temporary “no parking” zone where you or your movers can unload easily. Requirements vary throughout the state. To obtain a moving permit, contact the city offices or police department of the city you’re moving to for more information on fees and availability.
  • California’s state university system is the biggest in the country, with close to 450,000 students. If you are moving to California, it may be wise to seek housing that’s located outside the immediate vicinity of its most densely populated universities: the City College of San Francisco, UCLA, CSU Fullerton, CSU Long Beach and San Diego State University. You can find more information on the various universities in California here.
  • With a climate that can vary greatly depending on your location, be sure to check weather forecasts ahead of your planned move-in to avoid the possibility of heat exhaustion and dehydration in the hot, dry areas of the state, and to avoid snow delays or cold exposure at higher elevations.
  • Complete a change of address form with the USPS a week prior to your move to allow for the 7- to 10-day lag that can often accompany the necessary completion of paperwork.
  • When hiring a moving company, always check the company’s record with the Better Business Bureau, and be on the lookout for the possibility of frequently perpetrated moving scams.