Chipman Relocation & Logistics Acquires Olsen & Fielding Moving Services

 

Chipman Relocation & Logistics, a full-service moving,
storage and logistics company, is pleased to announce the
acquisition of Olsen & Fielding Moving Services in
Sacramento, CA.
Olsen & Fielding provided professional moving solutions to
residential and corporate customers, as well as the U.S.
Department of Defense (DoD). Founded in 1952 under the
name National Transfer and Storage, the company
rebranded as Olsen & Fielding Moving Services in 1988.
“During that time, Olsen & Fielding continued to set

themselves apart from other companies with each customer-
centric relocation they performed,” says Justin Chipman,

President and Chairman of the Board at Chipman Relocation
& Logistics.
“Like Chipman, Olsen and Fielding has a rich history,” he
adds. “Culturally, it’s a synergistic fit for both companies, as
we share common core values and a deep-rooted understanding of operating as a growth-oriented family-
owned business.” The Chipman family looks forward to welcoming the talented members of Olsen & Fielding into
our organization.

Olsen & Fielding will be under the management of industry veteran Edward Melton. Edward will blend the Olsen & Fielding team into his existing 25 person team in the Natomas area of Sacramento.  The combined companies will give Chipman 145,000 sq ft of warehousing in Sacramento and daily capacity of over 50 crews.

 

About Chipman

Chipman Relocation & Logistics began in 1939 when Arthur &
Dorothy Chipman started Chipman Moving & Storage in
Vallejo, California. A multi-generational family business, the
company has continued to expand through the years. Today,
Chipman operates multiple locations throughout the West
Coast, and is a shareholder agent of Unigroup, Inc., the
largest household goods transportation company in North
America.
The acquisition of Olsen and Fielding will provide Chipman
with wide access to one of the most recognizable names in
moving–Mayflower Transit–in the Sacramento
market. Chipman says the acquisition will also allow
Chipman Relocation & Logistics to better serve agent partners
and clients with additional capacity, warehouse space, and
customer facing resources.
“Together, we will make an impact by having a stronger team
with increased capacity, while maintaining the singular goal
of providing our collective customers with a remarkable
experience every step of the way—everyday,” says Justin
Chipman.

Planning = Execution….not really

Have you been frustrated when well developed and well funded plans fail to produce results? Strategic planning, as difficult and painful as it feels when immersed in the data and long meetings CANNOT guarantee predictable results without an execution plan. Planning by itself , albeit critical is simply wasting time and resources without strict accountability actions baked into the sauce.

Suggested reading on this topic:

Execution: The Discipline of Getting Things Done  by Larry Bossidy 

person writing on white book
Photo by rawpixel.com on Pexels.com

Hospitality Experts in Sacramento adds a West Sacramento Facility

The Sacramento Metro market is the HOTTEST hospitality market in California.

Chipman Relocations and Logistics/ Sacramento run by industry veteran Ed Melton (916-563-7472,  emelton@chipmanrelo.com) has taken his team to entirely different level.

  • Freight Management
  • Warehouse management – on demand
  • Model room installation
  • Room in a box experts
  • 24/7 Deliveries
  • Installation
  • Headboard Installation experts
  • Art Work installation
  • Fixture and lighting installation
  • Project management
  • Space planning
  • Carpet storage
  • Attic stock inventory management
  • White glove service / 24/7

 

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Pallet Positions available in SAFE West Sacramento business district.

Sales Presentations: Present Like You Mean It Written

By: Julie Hansen Total Views: 1627

THANKS JULIE!

In order to strike a balance between no theme and full-on theme park, it’s important to understand how to choose a theme that’s right for your presentation and your audience.


A group of flight attendants in matching uniforms strolled through the boardroom handing out drinks and snack-sized peanuts to the executive audience in the boardroom. After some puzzled looks, one of the flight attendants announced: “Buckle your seat belts, you’re in for a ride!” Landlocked training program? Nope. Just an example of a sales presentation venturing into full theme park territory, thus defeating its primary purpose: anchoring their solution to the prospect’s goals or objectives.

A theme can be a powerful unifying tool – especially for longer or team presentations — but there’s a fine line that can be crossed that can spell disaster for your presentation (as it did for this sales team in the above example) when you don’t have a good understanding of what you’re trying to accomplish and some of the traps that you can stumble into.

What is a Presentation Theme?

A theme underscores the central message of your presentation in a way that is meaningful and memorable for your customer. The most effective presentation themes center around prospect’s objectives (growth, competitive advantage, innovation, etc.) and how you’re going to help them achieve it. A theme can typically be described with a few words or a strong image. Although used prominently in your opening and closing, a good theme often runs like a thread throughout your presentation, even influencing your slide design and messaging.

What a Presentation theme is not:

Your Brand.

Don’t make the mistake of confusing your product or service “theme” with your presentation theme. While materials provided by your marketing department may be good, most are focused on your product or company and not specific to your prospect’s unique goals or challenges. A generic theme will not resonate with your customer and provide very little in the way of value or “stickiness.”

Your Customer’s Brand.

I’m all for using a customer’s language and examples from their world, however using their product or branding as a theme is not as unique or effective as you might think. Case in point: An experienced sales team I was working with was pitching a six-figure solution to the Disney organization. Their initial idea was to use a Disney character theme with each section of the presentation focused on a particular character, complete with Disney character props, videos and pictures. At our first meeting I asked the team how many “Disney-themed” sales presentations they thought Disney executives had sat through. The first time was probably cute. The fifteenth? Not so much. We worked together to come up with a theme targeted to the unique goals Disney had in a specific area that their solution resolved. (They won the deal.)

How to choose a theme for your sales presentation:

In order to strike a balance between no theme and full-on theme park, it’s important to understand how to choose a theme that’s right for your presentation and your audience. Before picking out a theme, consider these three questions:

  1. What do you want to accomplish? Different themes convey different emotions. For example, a sports-related theme may be good for challenging or motivating a prospect, a space-related theme may serve to inspire them to greater heights.
  2. What is the tone? Serious? Light-hearted? Humorous? The tone of your presentation should be consistent with your theme. For example, if your message is about turning a company around from the brink of disaster, a theme about badminton may be a little lightweight to support such a substantial subject.
  3. What are the visual possibilities? A good theme lends itself to a clear visual. The more instantly recognizable the better. For example, a theme of “teamwork” might be easily identified by a celebrating sports team or two clasped hands, while a theme of “maximizing value” might be more difficult to quickly convey.

Finding your theme:

Coming up with a theme can be a challenge if you’re not a creative type. Here are some suggestions to help you get started finding the right theme:

  • Brainstorm: If you’re working as a team, plan a brainstorming session with one rule: There are no bad ideas! If you can’t all get together in one place, have everyone list off ten ideas and submit them via email by a certain date. You can then run a poll and vote on the top choice.
  • Review your core message. This is the 10,000-foot view of what you’re trying to say to your prospect or how you’re trying to make her feel. Your presentation itself can be a good source for this core message. Try looking in these sections:
    • Your customer’s objectives: In discovery you should have identified the challenges your customer faces and what desired outcome from your solution was most meaningful for them. Can you describe it in a word or two? Is it freedom, innovation, visibility?
    •  Your competitive advantage: If your presentation is focused on “why buy us” – in other words, they know they need your solution but the decision to buy from is not made — you may want to create a theme around a competitive advantage. For example, if mobility is important to your prospect and your competitors are lacking in this area, a theme like “The Power of Now” can highlight your strengths.